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How to use an inexpensive GPS with a LifeDrive

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Headline text Edit

Cost Time Difficulty Age Group
99$US 1h easy 15+
About:Ratings


The GPS and the LifeDriveEdit

The LifeDrive (LD) can connect easily with a Bluetooth Global Positioning System (GPS) to obtain data such as position, time and altitude of your current location. The only thing you need is an inexpensive GPS device and software to communicate the LD with the GPS. In the recent years there are many Bluetooth GPS devices available costing less than 100$US. On the other hand, there are many good quality software programs that are free operating on the PalmOS.

Inexpensive GPS unitsEdit

There are many GPS units that will work along with the LD. One of them is the inexpensive Keychain Freedom mini GPS manufactured by Freedom Input LTD[1]that can be bought for 99.99 USD at ThinkGeek[2]. This is a small device equipped with a rechargeable internal battery. It is extremely easy to use and operate.

Free software Edit

Once you have your GPS device working, you can read its generated data into the LD using several pieces of software. I have installed the following with very decent results:

  • Where am I?[3] is a program developed by Marcin Orlowski that will interrogate your LD for the current position and will immediately allow access via wifi to Google Maps[4] so that you may see your location in a satellite or street map virtually anywhere in the world (of course you will not have wifi in the middle of the Amazons). You need to install Google Maps in the LD but this is free software as well.
  • CetusGPS[5] is described as "the Swiss Army Knife of GPS tracking and field data collection. It is intended for use by GIS surveyors, scientists, explorers and GPS enthusiasts who need to extend the features of their standard GPS equipment.
  • GeoNiche[6] is a PalmOS based program developed by RayDar and it is designed specifically for geocaching, hiking, fishing, bicycling, and other outdoor activities.
  • cotoGPS[7] is a GPS program for Palm Powered Devices developed by Thomas Runge. It shows all important information such as position, altitude and time.

See alsoEdit

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